Seattle woman, 25, who earns 0,000 a year says she STILL can’t afford simple luxuries like dining out and the gym

Seattle woman, 25, who earns $100,000 a year says she STILL can’t afford simple luxuries like dining out and the gym

By Ben Barry and Kelsi Karruli for Dailymail.Com

20:47 30 January 2024, updated 20:56 30 January 2024

A woman who earns $100,000 a year has claimed her salary is still not enough to support her lifestyle – bemoaning the ‘downgrades’ she has had to make to her regular outings, from ditching her gym membership to avoiding eating out.

Natalie Fisher, 25, and her husband, Keldon, 30, of Seattle, Washington, both work in the tech industry and bring home a combined salary of $200,000.

As a result of their six-figure salaries, Natalie admits the couple experienced a “climbing lifestyle”, which saw them spend more because they were bringing home more cash.

But soon the couple found themselves hemorrhaging money, particularly due to rising inflation and the rising cost of living – leading them to cut back on the small luxuries they were once able to enjoy.

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Natalie Fischer, 25, and her husband, Keldon, 30, of Seattle, Washington, both work in the tech industry and bring home a combined salary of $200,000
Earning $100,000 a year, she revealed she had to downgrade her lifestyle because she could no longer afford to go to the gym or eat out due to the high cost of living
And despite each earning six-figure salaries, Natalie claims they lived a “lifestyle” that made them spend more because they brought home more cash.

Before cutting back on their spending, Natalie and Keldon often dined out with friends and took luxury trips to Rome, Mexico and Alaska.

The couple spent about $4,000 a month — $2,738 on their two-bedroom apartment, $1,163 on bills, $200 on groceries and $300 on eating out.

Natalie said: “I consider myself and my husband middle class. We live in the greater Seattle area and have both held nine-to-five jobs in the tech industry.

“We both make over $100,000, and as we started making more money, we treated ourselves a lot more.”

In August 2023, Natalie and Keldon tied the knot after saving $20,000 for their special day – prompting them to spend carefully in 2024.

In an effort to cut costs, the couple canceled their $208 gym memberships, Natalie stopped treating herself to monthly manicures and pedicures, which cost her $100, and now the chicks only eat out once once a week.

He added: “A big reason we decided to downgrade our lifestyle is because we didn’t know where our money was going.”

As the couple’s salaries increased, they experienced what they called a “climbing lifestyle” – where they wouldn’t think twice about spending more because they could.

But soon the couple didn’t know where all their money had gone, so in an effort to beat rising inflation
In an effort to cut costs, the couple canceled their $208 gym memberships, Natalie stopped pampering herself with monthly manicures and pedicures, which cost her $100

Natalie said: “Just five years ago we were broke students. As we started making more money, we treated ourselves more.

“We weren’t too concerned about spending money to go out, get my hair done, or travel.”

The couple spent $208 a month each on gym memberships and would eat out two to three times a week – averaging $60 each time.

Natalie said: “Last year was a bit of an anomaly for us – me and my husband got married which cost a lot of money.

“We traveled a lot and had a lot of overhead so we didn’t put as much money into savings.

“We’re trying to cut those unnecessary costs.”

Natalie and Keldon are now trying to save $200 each and want to use their savings for a travel fund to visit Guam, the Philippines, and Japan.

As of early 2024, the couple gave up eating out and opted for more home-cooked meals.

They’ve also canceled their gym memberships and are working to leave behind any credit cards that have annual fees.

As the couple’s wages rose, they experienced what they called a “climbing lifestyle” – where they wouldn’t think twice about spending more because they could
Natalie and Keldon are now trying to save $200 each and want to use their savings for a travel fund
Natalie and Keldon are now trying to save $200 each and want to use their savings for a travel fund

Natalie said: “I noticed it was really hard to keep track of how much we were spending when we went out. I was living beyond my means.

“I want to really increase the savings we have and I feel like we’re spending too much so I’m trying to balance that out this year.

“I know we’ve experienced lifestyle creep — that’s a big reason why I wanted to downgrade my lifestyle and track where every dollar goes.”

In 2023, the couple spent a total of $4,601, now they’ve cut their spending and shared their new budget goals.

Couple’s Monthly Spending Target 2024- Mortgage: $2,378, Bills: $753, Gym Membership: $0, Food: $227, Eating Out: $0, Clothing Shopping: $10, Socializing: $0, Savings : $400. Total: $3,368.

According to PayScale, the cost of living in Seattle is 50 percent higher than most areas.

According to Apartment List, the recommended household income for a two-bedroom apartment is $78,240 per year.

At the end of 2022, the median household income was $105,391, according to the US Census Bureau.

A six-figure salary was once considered the benchmark of a comfortable lifestyle, but new research shows that it really depends on where you live.

A report by GoBankingRates analyzed how much a $100,000 annual salary would stretch across America’s 50 largest cities.

According to the survey, after bills, a person making $100,000 living in Seattle has only about $24,330.

In 2023, the couple spent a total of $4,601, now they’ve cut their spending and shared their new budget goals
Due to the rising cost of living, many people across the country are trying to cut back on their spending

Many people have turned to living in cars or trucks due to inflation.

Due to the rising cost of living, many people across the country are trying to cut back on their spending.

Although inflation has decreased in recent months, it remains high at 7.1%.

According to consumer data firm Dunnhumby, a third of households skip meals or reduce their portion sizes to save money.

The researchers found that 18 percent of the 2,000 survey participants noticed that they were not getting enough food to eat.

Additionally, 31 percent of households have reduced their portions due to empty pantries as a result of rising grocery prices.

In addition to the cost of food, millions of people across the country lack a financial safety net.

According to researchers, 64 percent of participants admitted that they would not be able to come up with $400 in an emergency.

Many have suffered because of inflation, which has caused the prices of basic goods to soar — including prices for meat and poultry by 10.4%, grains by 15.1% and fruits and vegetables by 8.1% .

Gas prices are another pressure point for many people across the country, up nearly 60 percent in the past year, with the cost of airfare rising more than 34 percent and used car prices more than 7 percent.

Clothing costs increased by 5.2 percent, total housing costs increased by 5.5 percent, and delivery services increased by 14.4 percent.

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