Brits don’t start taking their health seriously until they’re 38

Brits don’t start taking their health seriously until they’re 38

  • A survey of 2,000 Brits found 11% admit they don’t take their health very seriously
  • It also found that celebrities play a role in getting people to take better care of their health



Britons don’t start taking their health seriously until the age of 38 — and often only out of fear, research has found.

The study of 2,000 adults found that starting to have new pains or reaching a milestone birthday were also among the factors that encouraged them to take better care of themselves.

Others were prompted to take action after a loved one died or experienced a health problem.

Respondents were asked at what age they first started taking their health seriously — the average answer was 38.

The study of 2,000 adults found that starting to have new pains or reaching a milestone birthday were also among the factors that encouraged them to take better care of themselves. Others were prompted to take action after a loved one died or experienced a health problem

They were then asked what made them start taking their health more seriously at this age, with fear of health being one of the most important reasons (23%), as well as the start of new aches and pains (28%). and feeling physically weak (28 percent).

Celebrities also play a role in getting people to take better care of their health, with about one in 30 saying a famous person suffering from a medical problem made them take things more seriously.

Following the announcement that King Charles was being treated for an enlarged prostate, the NHS website’s page on the condition received 11 times more hits than the day before — with one person visiting the site every five seconds.

The OnePoll study, commissioned by Bupa, found that 11 per cent of adults admit they do not take their health very seriously.

Almost half (45 per cent) didn’t pay much attention at a younger age as they generally felt fine, while 36 per cent just felt they were too young to need to worry about it – and 25 per cent thought it wouldn’t happen nothing wrong with them.

In retrospect, 84 percent feel they took their health for granted when they were younger, and 39 percent regret not taking better care of their health before their twenties.

Celebrities also play a role in getting people to take better care of their health, with about one in 30 saying a famous person suffering from a medical problem made them take things more seriously. Following the announcement that King Charles was being treated for an enlarged prostate, the NHS website’s page on the condition received 11 times more hits than the day before ¿ with one person visiting the site every five seconds

Almost four in 10 (38 per cent) admitted their teenage years saw them eat a poor diet, while 30 per cent claim they drank too much alcohol and 28 per cent felt they let stress get to them too much.

However, 30 percent have asked someone else to take more care of their health, including their partner (39 percent), a parent (33 percent), or a medical professional (30 percent).

As a result, 45 percent now try to get enough sleep, 43 percent drink more water, and 34 percent try to reduce stress to take care of their health.

The study also found that 21 percent are currently dissatisfied with the state of their physical health, while 32 percent are dissatisfied with their fitness levels.

Dr Elizabeth Rogers, deputy clinical director at Bupa Health clinics, which offer preventive health checks, said: “It can be very easy to ignore your health – particularly when you’re young or feel everything is fine.

“No one wants to think that there might be something wrong, but often the first signs of a problem are not obvious.

“Sometimes it can take a bit of a wake-up call before you start taking your health more seriously, whether it’s getting sick yourself or seeing a loved one or even someone you know have a problem.

He added: “There is no one-size-fits-all approach to health and making even small changes to your exercise program or diet can make a real difference to both your physical and mental health, as well as preventing the development of future situations. .’

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