Ascension Michigan CEO discusses faith in health care at UTG at Work roundtable – Detroit Catholic

Ascension Michigan CEO discusses faith in health care at UTG at Work roundtable – Detroit Catholic

grady edit 2

Ascension Michigan CEO and President Dr. Kevin Grady spoke at the UTG at Work Healthcare Roundtable on Wednesday, January 24, about confidence in the workplace. (Photo by Gabriella Patti | Detroit Catholic)

Dr. Kevin Grady tells local professionals that growing up Catholic directly impacted his vision and values ​​as a health care leader

Detroit — Dr. Kevin Grady’s Catholic faith influences every decision he makes as a medical professional and as Ascension’s Michigan regional president and CEO.

The hospital executive and physician spoke with a number of local professionals on Jan. 24 at the second Healthcare Leadership Roundtable hosted by UTG at Work, a new apostolic organization whose mission is to help Catholic professionals Bringing faith into the workplace.

The roundtable, sponsored by the Michigan Catholic Foundation, preceded a Mass at St. Aloysius Parish in downtown Detroit, followed by a luncheon and discussion hosted by Dr. Grady next door at the Westin Cadillac Hotel.

UTG at Work (“UTG” stands for “Unleash the Gospel”) launched in 2023 to help “women and men understand their identity as missionary disciples, equip them to discover their unique calling from God, and support them in their mission to Its mission statement is to joyfully deliver faith and witness to Christ and the Gospel in the workplace. The apostolate is led by Deacon Michael Horton, former director of missionary strategic planning for the Archdiocese of Detroit, and Mary Martin, a former coach and team leader in the ministry.

At the request of Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit, who supports the apostolate, Deacon Houghton and Martin said the first few events have focused on leadership in the health care industry people. However, the talks are open to anyone.

The roundtable, sponsored by the Michigan Catholic Foundation, preceded a Mass at St. Aloysius Parish in downtown Detroit, followed by a luncheon and discussion hosted by Dr. Grady next door at the Westin Cadillac Hotel.

The roundtable, sponsored by the Michigan Catholic Foundation, preceded a Mass at St. Aloysius Parish in downtown Detroit, followed by a luncheon and discussion hosted by Dr. Grady next door at the Westin Cadillac Hotel.

Dr. Grady told attendees that the Catholic perspective has had a real impact on the field of health care. The difference is felt not only among staff but also among patients.

“(At Ascension), we provide faith-based health care, rooted in the loving ministry of Jesus,” Dr. Grady said. “We are committed to helping all people, with a special focus on those who are poor and vulnerable. We are advocates for a compassionate and just society. The common denominator that employees stay at Ascension St. Johns isn’t the paycheck. It’s not ‘food.’ It is a commitment to making faith-based Catholic health care available to everyone, especially those in need. “

Dr Grady said there were significant disparities in health care and to ensure care was delivered equitably, health professionals needed to consider how to make health care fair rather than equal.

For example, he said, medical conditions may affect different communities in different ways, which should inform how health care professionals treat them.

“For example, if I’m treating high blood pressure in African Americans and I use the same (methods) as non-African Americans, then I’m not providing them with the best care,” Dr. Grady explained, Reference identify unique factors that may contribute to higher rates of hypertension in black communities. “It’s equal, but it’s unfair because it doesn’t take into account the patient’s (specific needs).”

UTG at Work is led by Deacon Michael Horton (pictured), former director of missionary strategic planning for the Archdiocese of Detroit, and Mary Martin, a former coach and team leader in the ministry.

UTG at Work is led by Deacon Michael Horton (pictured), former director of missionary strategic planning for the Archdiocese of Detroit, and Mary Martin, a former coach and team leader in the ministry.

At the request of Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit, who supports the apostolate, Deacon Houghton and Martin (pictured, left) said the first few events focused on health care Healthcare Industry Leaders. However, the talks are open to anyone.

At the request of Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit, who supports the apostolate, Deacon Houghton and Martin (pictured, left) said the first few events focused on health care Healthcare Industry Leaders. However, the talks are open to anyone.

Dr. Grady said a personal goal during the current health care crisis with a physician shortage is to help guide new doctors and nurses transitioning into the field. He has served on the Wayne State University School of Medicine Admissions Committee for 10 years, his first time in this role after realizing there were only two people of color in the current class.

“This is not (representative of) the community they serve,” Dr. Grady said. “I want to be on the medical school admissions committee. Over the course of this decade, we have transformed the Wayne Medical School class to look like the community it serves. What we have now is a community of people who were trained here and retained Doctor here.”

Dr. Grady said that as part of his responsibilities on the committee, he interviews prospective medical students. His problems all stem from his faith upbringing and are rooted in the treatment and dignity of others.

“One question (I ask) is, ‘If the golden rule is to treat others the way you would like to be treated, what is the platinum rule?'” Dr. Grady said. “For the first time in nine years, someone answered the question correctly in about six seconds. He said, ‘Oh, it’s simple: Treat people with integrity. them Want to get treatment. ‘”

Dr. Grady concluded his presentation by answering questions from attendees, including his role as a health care leader, the importance of equitable care, and the recent partnership between several Ascension hospitals in southeastern Michigan and Henry Ford Healthcare System merging.

As a leader, Dr. Grady said his goal is to oversee change in the way health care is delivered, and his faith informs how he does that.

“My job is to change the way we deliver health care: We deliver it to everyone,” Dr. Grady said. “We serve the right patients at the right time, in the right place, at the right price, with a smile. So does that come directly from my Catholic upbringing? That’s right, it does. Because if I do that, I Just to maintain my mission, my vision and my values.”

Print

Recommended reading

catholic health care

AOD DCS - Bottom of article

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *